Can Alcohol Withdrawal Cause Seizures?

Is There Rehab for Xanax Addiction?

While alcohol is heavily advertised and sold in many stores, it is one of the most dangerous substances from which to withdraw. Alcohol withdrawal symptoms can be mild or may be severe enough to require hospitalization. You may have heard about things like delirium tremens but may also wonder can alcohol withdrawal cause seizures? Alcohol withdrawal can cause seizures and, if not managed properly, can be fatal. Because of the symptoms of alcohol withdrawal, many find themselves unable to quit drinking. At Laguna View Detox, we understand what happens to your body when it becomes dependent on alcohol, and we know how to help you safely withdraw.  

What Is Alcohol Withdrawal?

Alcohol withdrawal syndrome is the collection of symptoms that occur when someone stops drinking after regularly drinking. Alcohol withdrawal symptoms can start as early as four hours after your last drink, with the worst symptoms occurring between thirty-six and seventy-two hours. While some of the symptoms can be mild, others can be much more serious and even fatal.  While withdrawing from alcohol, your symptoms will likely begin much like a hangover. You may experience nausea, vomiting, agitation, anxiety, irritability, and headache. As the withdrawal progresses, you may experience itching, pins and needles sensations, numbness, burning sound sensitivity, and light sensitivity. You may also have hallucinations, become disoriented, experience insomnia, and have tremors. While all of these symptoms will result in a great deal of discomfort, your symptoms can be managed with medication. The goal during detox is to prevent the more severe symptoms. 

Can Alcohol Withdrawal Cause Seizures?

The severity of alcohol withdrawal is somewhat determined by how much you usually drink and for how long. It is also influenced by the number of times that you have gone through alcohol withdrawal in the past. If you have safely detoxed in the past, you may wonder if alcohol withdrawal causes seizures. Alcohol withdrawal can cause seizures, especially if you have been drinking heavily for a long time. The risk for attacks is also increased if you have experienced seizures or delirium tremens when withdrawing in the past. The severity of alcohol withdrawal symptoms also increases each time you withdraw due to what’s known as the kindling effect. 

What Is the Safest Way to Detox From Alcohol?

Because of the possibility of delirium tremens and seizures, the safest way to detox from alcohol is under medical supervision. Most medical professionals rely on the Clinical Institute Withdrawal Assessment (CIWA) protocol to monitor alcohol withdrawal. This protocol enables medical professionals to assess your progress through the withdrawal and treat your symptoms to keep you safe. The protocol measures all of your symptoms, including:

  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Tremors
  • Anxiety
  • Agitation
  • Sweating
  • Orientation
  • Tactile disturbances
  • Auditory disturbances
  • Visual disturbances
  • Headache

 

Measuring these symptoms and their severity allows the treatment team to provide medications to manage your symptoms and help your body rid itself of the alcohol more safely. It also allows the treatment team to predict the likelihood of delirium tremens or seizures to initiate treatments more quickly. Detoxing on your own can be dangerous and even fatal. 

How To Get Your Loved One Help With Alcoholism

At Laguna View Detox, we understand how alcohol withdrawal can stop you from getting sober. We also know how to help you safely detox so that you can move on to a life in recovery.  We offer round-the-clock care in a luxurious, inpatient treatment setting in one of the most beautiful areas in California. We’ll ensure your loved one makes it through detox safely and then help them build a new sober life. 

 

Our committed and compassionate staff are some of the best in the industry, and they’ll work with your loved one to create an individualized, holistic treatment plan. We understand the interplay between mental health and addiction and are here to help. We also understand the importance of helping you build a support network for when you leave treatment.  We will care for you while you safely detox and then guide you through inpatient treatment and aftercare. So contact us today and let us help you break free from addiction!  

Is Xanax Physically Addictive?

Is Xanax Physically Addictive?

The sad truth is that prescribed medications are not always safe, especially when they are not used correctly. While the consensus is that drugs such as Xanax should only be prescribed and taken for a short time, many physicians continue to prescribe these medications for long-term use. Additionally, you may find that you want or need more Xanax to continue to manage your anxiety and function in your life. As you find yourself relying more and more on the medication, you may begin to ask, is Xanax physically addictive? Unfortunately, the short answer is yes and, if you attempt to simply stop taking Xanax abruptly, your body will prove it to you. At Laguna View Detox, we understand how easy it is to become dependent on medications like Xanax, and we are here to help you safely stop relying on them to live.  

What Is Xanax?

Xanax belongs to a class of drugs known as benzodiazepines. Benzodiazepines often called benzos, are used to treat panic disorders, generalized anxiety disorders, insomnia, seizures, social phobia, and more. Benzos are a controlled substance. Xanax is considered to be a longer-duration benzo and is one of the most commonly prescribed benzos. Xanax enhances the effects of GABA which is a calming neurotransmitter in your brain. By improving the effects of GABA, Xanax reduces feelings of stress and panic. However, like all benzos, Xanax is a central nervous system depressant and must be used with caution.  It doesn’t just relax your mind; it slows down your body. Xanax can cause drowsiness, lightheadedness, dizziness, difficulty concentrating, and many other side effects. In addition, mixing it with other drugs or alcohol can depress your breathing, which can be fatal. 

Is Xanax Physically Addictive?

When you take any medication regularly, your body adapts and changes how it functions. Because of this, it can be dangerous to stop taking the medication abruptly. This is true of many drugs such as blood pressure medications, anti-seizure medications, and especially benzodiazepines. 

 

You may wonder is Xanax physically addictive, and the answer is an absolute yes. Nearly thirty percent of individuals who take Xanax will develop withdrawal symptoms after only four to six weeks of use. Withdrawal symptoms will start anywhere from two to eight days after your last Xanax, depending on the dosage you have been taking and how long you have been taking it. Physical withdrawal symptoms include fatigue, weakness, hot and cold flushes, increased heart rate, muscle spasms, and seizures. If not appropriately managed, Xanax withdrawal can be fatal.

Is Xanax Emotionally Addictive?

Xanax doesn’t just change how your body functions; it changes how your brain functions. As you rely on Xanax to help you manage your anxiety, you will come to believe that you can’t manage without it. This is especially true if you do not pair therapy and other tools with Xanax. If you abruptly stop taking Xanax, you will not only experience physical symptoms; you will also experience psychological and emotional symptoms. Xanax withdrawal symptoms include increased anxiety, panic attacks, mood swings, impaired concentration, agitation, insomnia, and more. Because of this, your detox must be done under medical supervision so that your symptoms can be managed. 

How To Get Help With a Xanax Addiction Today

At Laguna View Detox, we understand how easy it is to rely on Xanax and find yourself addicted to using it. We are equipped to help you safely break free from Xanax and find safer ways to manage your anxiety.  We offer round-the-clock care in a luxurious, inpatient treatment setting in one of the most beautiful areas in California. We’ll ensure you detox safely and help you build a new sober life. 

Our committed and compassionate staff are some of the best in the industry, and they’ll work with you to create an individualized, holistic treatment plan. We understand the interplay between mental health and addiction and are here to help. We also understand the importance of helping you build a support network for when you leave treatment.  We will care for you while you safely detox and then guide you through inpatient treatment and aftercare. So contact us today and let us help you break free from addiction!